The Noosa Fishing Report Brought to
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Alvey Reels Australia

As at Monday November 30, 2009

OFFSHORE: The variable northerlies continued to drive the temperatures up and by Saturday afternoon the hot winds had picked up in pace and we were up over the 30 degree mark and feeling it. From then on offshore was a no go as the winds pushed through 25 knot barrier, bringing with them hot stormy afternoons with just a threat of rain but not much more. Fortunately there were enough fishable days before the blow to keep everyone happy and those who went out wide reported snapper, moses perch and gold band snapper at the Barwon Banks. Chardon's Wide was another good option, producing snapper, pearl perch, venus tusk fish and, as you can see by the photos below, mahi-mahi or dolphin fish.
Mahi-Mahi or Dolphin Fish
Local angler Steve Chapman (above) was out there on Friday on a full day Cougar One charter when his bonito bait (caught earlier at Sunshine Reef) was taken by the 8.5kg mahi-mahi he's posing with.
Mahi-Mahi or Dolphin Fish
And on the same charter, Bevan Efford used a half pilchard bait to attract the attention of the 7kg fish he's pictured with. These fish have some amazing colours, Steve's fish being green/gold while Bevan's was initially bright iridescent blue.
North Reef was also worth a look with the standouts there being scarlet sea perch, red emperor and the odd cobia.
Spotted Mackerel
Sunshine Reef started to come out of its slumber and with the arrival of the first of the spotted mackerel there this week things should start to hot up pretty quickly. Charles Boyle (above) was out there on Friday with local offshore fishing guru Craig 'Chicko' Vella when his floated pilchard bait was taken by this 3kg 'Spotty'. The rest of their catch was coral trout, sweetlip and pearl perch. Sunshine Reef also produced a few snapper, moses perch, bonito and parrot fish. Apart from that, the odd snapper was on the bite at Jew Shoal in Laguna Bay.


ONSHORE: The coastal surf beaches were less than exciting this week with no reports of any note at all from the North Shore. Across the bay, the National Park headland rocks produced bream to 38cm while Alexandria Bay was the spot for whiting. Further south, bream and tarwhine were on the bite at north Sunshine Beach while dart were active at Marcus Beach. Last but not least, Peregian Beach fired well in the mornings with quality whiting being the standout species.
Flathead
In the estuary, the better bream were on the bite down at the river mouth while trevally fired up amongst the bait schools at night with the Woods Bays and Munna Point seeing some frenzied activity at times.
Flathead were quite well spread and responding well to trolled hard body lures this week with best results coming from the Munna Point area (along with mangrove jacks and trevally), the deeper waters out from O' Boats (on soft plastics) and up around Tewantin where trevally to 2kg were also active.
The Noosa Waters canals were good for a few 'Lizards' as Paul Hempstead (above) discovered on Friday. Paul's trolled Gold Bomber proved too much of a draw for the fish in the photo but fortunately he was happy to keep it only long enough for a quick pic before releasing it back into the water. Apart from that, tarpon were on the prowl at night in Weyba Creek.
Note: The holiday speed limit starts tomorrow. This means that a 6 knot zone will apply from T Boats to the river mouth.

Hey! We finally managed to get the time to sit down and write a more updated and expanded version of our hugely popular publication 'Fishing Noosa'.

We've covered fresh and salt water.

Onshore and offshore.

Where to find them. How to target them.

Best rigs, best baits & lures, best tactics.

Want to know more?

Just CLICK HERE or either one of the graphics of the front or back cover.


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